5 Ways Vegans Can Meet Their Protein Needs

Getting protein is the primary concern for all the individuals who want to switch to a plant-based diet. Contrary to general perception, being a vegan does not mean a protein-deficient person

Getting protein is the primary concern for all the individuals who want to switch to a plant-based diet. This is the reason why their every conversation with vegan revolves around one common question, "Where do you get your protein?".

Contrary to general perception, being a vegan does not mean a protein-deficient person. Especially now, when getting plant-based protein is much easier and healthier than meat-protein. A recent Harvard study suggests that people who eat more protein from plants and less from animals may live longer even when they have unhealthy habits like heavy drinking or smoking.

However, for this, you need to learn what meals you can focus on to ensure that you are meeting your daily protein needs.

Although the list can be extensive, we will only see 5 plant-based foods that are rich in protein and can meet your daily protein needs. These include:

  1. Nutritional Yeast

Commonly known as "nooch", it is an inactive yeast that looks yellowish and has a unique cheesy taste. You can get 4 grams of protein from 2 tablespoons of nutritional yeast. Additionally, it yields vitamin B12 which is vital for the body's nerve and blood cells, and which also takes part in DNA making. You can enjoy nutritional yeast in sauces or dressings, sprinkle it on your next pasta dish or toss it into a bowl of popcorn.

  1. Whole Grains

Generally, we see whole grains as carbohydrates, but in real, whole grains can be the best source of protein in your daily meal. Along with delivering vitamins, fibre and minerals to your diet, whole grains add high proteins in the meal too. To keep your protein baskets full, start your day with a warm bowl of oatmeal. In lunch, use fresh fruits with quinoa salad. And in the evening, wild rice-stuffed peppers can best fill your plate.

  1. Green Veggies

Green vegetables, often added in the diet to get vitamins and minerals, offer more than we expect. For instance, Brussels, spinach and green peas contain high levels of protein to cater to your protein needs. Needless to mention the fact that greens are antioxidant-rich, low in calories and full of fibre. To make your eating more fun, add cooked spinach to pasta, roast brussels sprouts or mix green peas into the curry.

  1. Potatoes

Often looked at as a humble spud, potato is a wholesome addition to your diet. One russet potato can contain 8 grams of protein - more than a banana - and is a vital source of fibre too. We have made it an unhealthy food due to french fries, but reality lies somewhere else. You can try potatoes of all type - roasted, baked, mashed or scalloped - to fulfil your protein needs.

  1. Seitan

Seitan can be found in plant-based diets as a staple. Staples are made with wheat gluten and look like meat due to their chewy and hearty texture. You can get 20 grams of protein from just 3-ounce of seitan. It can be made at home by wheat gluten, but you can also find it next to tofu in your refrigerated section of a local supermarket.

So, next time when someone asks you where do you get your proteins, simply answer: from plants.